The SNES Omnibus Volume 1 (A-M) Review

The SNES Omnibus Volume 1 (A-M) Review

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I get solicitations from a lot of publishers who want their book reviewed. The reality of the situation is that there just is not enough time to do them all. However, when something special comes along, I make sure to devote some time to sit down and take a look. The Super Nintendo Entertainment System holds true to my heart as one of the best video game platforms ever released in existence. The quality of the SNES video game library holds up even after almost 30 years. You can find just about any type of video game you can imagine on the Super Nintendo and if I could use one word to describe the games it would be polished. Sure there are some really bad games on every system, but the Super Nintendo seems to be the most consistent. Although it didn't have the raw speed that could be found on the Sega Genesis, the graphics, controller, and variety more than made up for this.

Brett Weiss, author of The 100 Greatest Video Games (1977-1987) has created a new series called the SNES Omnibus. Split up into two editions, Brett takes the entire Super Nintendo library and splits it right down the middle. The first release which debuted at the end of July covers all games that start with the letters A-M. Featured in a beautiful hard-bound edition in a glossy dust jacket features information about the famed 16-bit system and it's video game library.

The first thing you will notice when you crack open the SNES Omnibus is how colorful the pages are. Every page seems to stand out due to the massive amount of artwork that decorates throughout the book. Screenshots, box and cartridge art as well as original advertisements from magazines all adorn the pages of each game entry. Most entries stick to a single page per game, although there are some where two pages are necessary just due the sheer amount of information that was provided for that title. Contributor entries also are posted throughout, recalling memories of their childhood or how they had an opportunity to purchase a rarer title but failed to do so in the past.  All of it is entertaining and informative, and gives you a perspective into some of the lives of fellow video game collectors.

Each entry features information about the title, screenshots, box art, cartridge, and advertisements (if any).

Overall the SNES Omnibus Volume 1 is a great addition to any video game enthusiast's bookshelf.  I found myself scouring the pages of this masterpiece like I would as a child receiving this month's issue of Nintendo Power. I found no errors in any of the factoids presented. The paper quality is above par for most retrogaming books that are similar in nature. The only downside I found is now I have to wait until Volume 2 is released to get games N through Z! If you are remotely a fan of the Super Nintendo, you owe it to yourself to pick this book up. 

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